20
"1950’s England saw increased dilapidation and depression in working-class neighborhoods, and the import of American rock n’ roll. Narratives of the post-war individual rebuilding the self are far and wide, though tales of how a style can communicate this are harder to find. The Teds’ drape coat–easily identified with their mid-thigh length, slim-straight silhouette, and velvet cuffs and collar, most recently seen by aristocrats and middle class alike on Downton Abbey–and “drainpipe trouser,” as they were called, rejected England as much as it celebrated and reestablished it." (via Proper English: The Teddy Boy Suit and Its Tiny Revolution | Vol. 1 Brooklyn)

"1950’s England saw increased dilapidation and depression in working-class neighborhoods, and the import of American rock n’ roll. Narratives of the post-war individual rebuilding the self are far and wide, though tales of how a style can communicate this are harder to find. The Teds’ drape coat–easily identified with their mid-thigh length, slim-straight silhouette, and velvet cuffs and collar, most recently seen by aristocrats and middle class alike on Downton Abbey–and “drainpipe trouser,” as they were called, rejected England as much as it celebrated and reestablished it." (via Proper English: The Teddy Boy Suit and Its Tiny Revolution | Vol. 1 Brooklyn)

6
"When you see a woman truly wearing a suit it catches your eye, and she is an image hard to forget.  When Balzac wrote that “If clothing is the whole man, it is even more so the whole woman,” in 1830, he probably didn’t envision Marlene Dietrich, Katherine Hepburn, Grace Jones, or Patti Smith transforming garments traditionally made for men into something subversive, iconic, and beautiful." (via The Old Oxford: The Lady in the Suit | Vol. 1 Brooklyn)

"When you see a woman truly wearing a suit it catches your eye, and she is an image hard to forget.  When Balzac wrote that “If clothing is the whole man, it is even more so the whole woman,” in 1830, he probably didn’t envision Marlene Dietrich, Katherine Hepburn, Grace Jones, or Patti Smith transforming garments traditionally made for men into something subversive, iconic, and beautiful." (via The Old Oxford: The Lady in the Suit | Vol. 1 Brooklyn)