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"The evening’s first half found Mitchell, a charming presence throughout the night, introducing a pair of short stories that he admired. His approach to this favored transparency — namely, reading some of the stage directions. “7:35: You talk about what you read and how it connects to your work,” he said wryly. What this led to was a quick run-through of his influences, beginning with the “holy trinity” of J.R.R. Tolkien, Isaac Asimov, and Ursula K. Le Guin that inspired him in his youth. (Mitchell noted later that his fondness for Le Guin’s fiction was a lifelong constant.) He cited Anton Chekhov as “my #1,” and later invoked Mikhail Bulgakov (his name drew applause; “only in New York,” Mitchell remarked) and Haldór Laxness. In the case of the latter, Mitchell singled out the Icelandic writer’s novel Independent People, speaking rapturously about it." (via Touring David Mitchell’s Library at Symphony Space | Vol. 1 Brooklyn)

"The evening’s first half found Mitchell, a charming presence throughout the night, introducing a pair of short stories that he admired. His approach to this favored transparency — namely, reading some of the stage directions. “7:35: You talk about what you read and how it connects to your work,” he said wryly. What this led to was a quick run-through of his influences, beginning with the “holy trinity” of J.R.R. Tolkien, Isaac Asimov, and Ursula K. Le Guin that inspired him in his youth. (Mitchell noted later that his fondness for Le Guin’s fiction was a lifelong constant.) He cited Anton Chekhov as “my #1,” and later invoked Mikhail Bulgakov (his name drew applause; “only in New York,” Mitchell remarked) and Haldór Laxness. In the case of the latter, Mitchell singled out the Icelandic writer’s novel Independent People, speaking rapturously about it." (via Touring David Mitchell’s Library at Symphony Space | Vol. 1 Brooklyn)