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Personally, I think the term “independent literature” entails both the business end—writing created for/put out by authors and small presses that aren’t as influenced by a “market” as they are by the artistic value of the work itself—and something more vague and difficult to define. I guess that could be lumped into aesthetics, though that angle just gets too muddy. For instance, Mary Miller, who’s a pretty straightforward realist, falls under the “independent literature” umbrella for me, but so does Blake Butler and Ryan Call. Elizabeth Ellen and Rudolf Wurlitzer and Roxane Gay and Ed Skoog and Richard Chiem and Mary Ruefle and James Tate and Joseph McElroy all qualify, too, and the list just goes on and on. It just seems too difficult to corral them all under one particular aesthetic. (via Literary Seattle, Bar Crawls, and Defining Independent Literature: An Interview With APRIL Festival Co-Founder Willie Fitzgerald | Vol. 1 Brooklyn)

Personally, I think the term “independent literature” entails both the business end—writing created for/put out by authors and small presses that aren’t as influenced by a “market” as they are by the artistic value of the work itself—and something more vague and difficult to define. I guess that could be lumped into aesthetics, though that angle just gets too muddy. For instance, Mary Miller, who’s a pretty straightforward realist, falls under the “independent literature” umbrella for me, but so does Blake Butler and Ryan Call. Elizabeth Ellen and Rudolf Wurlitzer and Roxane Gay and Ed Skoog and Richard Chiem and Mary Ruefle and James Tate and Joseph McElroy all qualify, too, and the list just goes on and on. It just seems too difficult to corral them all under one particular aesthetic. (via Literary Seattle, Bar Crawls, and Defining Independent Literature: An Interview With APRIL Festival Co-Founder Willie Fitzgerald | Vol. 1 Brooklyn)

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