"The seated quartet of critics proved to be engaging, well prepared, and perhaps not surprisingly, remarkably well read. Beha began with a well-versed overview of harsh literary critiques. He cited Mary McCarthy’s infamous assertion that every word that Lillian Hellman ever wrote was a lie, including “and” and “the”. And the time Richard Ford so detested Colson Whitehead’s scathing 2002 review of A Multitude of Sins that years later he spit on Whitehead at a party. And Manny Farber’s assertion that to be a critic is very difficult, which sounded better when he said it. Most pointedly astute of all, Beha asked aloud what the value of “a hostile rhetorical” can be." (via A Night in the Pillory: “Should Critics Be Harsh?” Live at the New School | Vol. 1 Brooklyn)

"The seated quartet of critics proved to be engaging, well prepared, and perhaps not surprisingly, remarkably well read. Beha began with a well-versed overview of harsh literary critiques. He cited Mary McCarthy’s infamous assertion that every word that Lillian Hellman ever wrote was a lie, including “and” and “the”. And the time Richard Ford so detested Colson Whitehead’s scathing 2002 review of A Multitude of Sins that years later he spit on Whitehead at a party. And Manny Farber’s assertion that to be a critic is very difficult, which sounded better when he said it. Most pointedly astute of all, Beha asked aloud what the value of “a hostile rhetorical” can be." (via A Night in the Pillory: “Should Critics Be Harsh?” Live at the New School | Vol. 1 Brooklyn)