9
"I had the big idea for Boss Fight just a few months ago. I wondered if “33 1/3 for games” existed, it didn’t, and I couldn’t believe it. Excitement would come later, but in the moment it felt more like a shrug: “Reckon it better be me then.” It’s been a blast since then. I love games but was shamefully under-read when it game to games criticism, which is such a rich field. So I’ve been gorging myself. It’s also been really rewarding to work with Ken on covers, with Jesse Grce on the Kickstarter video, with our five authors on the beginnings of their books, and to correspond with readers about where they’d like to see the series go." (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Summer Camp Lit and Video Game Books: An Interview With “Fun Camp” Author and Boss Fight Books Publisher Gabe Durham)

"I had the big idea for Boss Fight just a few months ago. I wondered if “33 1/3 for games” existed, it didn’t, and I couldn’t believe it. Excitement would come later, but in the moment it felt more like a shrug: “Reckon it better be me then.” It’s been a blast since then. I love games but was shamefully under-read when it game to games criticism, which is such a rich field. So I’ve been gorging myself. It’s also been really rewarding to work with Ken on covers, with Jesse Grce on the Kickstarter video, with our five authors on the beginnings of their books, and to correspond with readers about where they’d like to see the series go." (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Summer Camp Lit and Video Game Books: An Interview With “Fun Camp” Author and Boss Fight Books Publisher Gabe Durham)

1
My concerns about form come from worry about why stories exist. People don’t tell stories to each other the way most writers write stories. People generally tell (written) stories in very oblique ways: in lab reports and legal briefs, contracts and small print, op-eds, emails, and memos. This makes stories that most people recognize as stories seem precious; they read like they ought to be under glass, in a museum (they sort of are, for most people—we read them on airplanes and beaches and otherwise steer clear of them). I like found forms because they still seem alive to me, and because I find them helpful in understanding a story’s reason for being. I don’t like to think of my fictions as ornament. I don’t think they’re frivolous, and so I don’t want to treat them that way.
14
We wanted to include as many organic sounds as possible so we took a lot of field samples with a fancy ‘Blow Out’ recording device and used a lot of common objects found around the Oakland streets where we recorded. There are knives, bricks, piano innards, tin foil, elevator doors, drum pedals, glass and much much more in there. We took all those sounds, processed with studio trickery, and matched them to an already finished music album with the goal being 3 separate co-linear musical experiences: music album, noise album and a merged version that is free for experimentation. It is the most interactive album we’ve made and we strongly encourage people to get their hands (and ears) dirty with it. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Band Booking: Talking J.G. Ballard and Noise With Seattle’s Iron Lung)

We wanted to include as many organic sounds as possible so we took a lot of field samples with a fancy ‘Blow Out’ recording device and used a lot of common objects found around the Oakland streets where we recorded. There are knives, bricks, piano innards, tin foil, elevator doors, drum pedals, glass and much much more in there. We took all those sounds, processed with studio trickery, and matched them to an already finished music album with the goal being 3 separate co-linear musical experiences: music album, noise album and a merged version that is free for experimentation. It is the most interactive album we’ve made and we strongly encourage people to get their hands (and ears) dirty with it. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Band Booking: Talking J.G. Ballard and Noise With Seattle’s Iron Lung)

3
To source the paper I went to a weird alcove-warehouse in the middle of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. You go through paper swatches like you do with paint swatches. I walked out of there spending a lot more money than I intended, because it turns out I’m a paper nerd. After that I formatted it and just printed it out on a laser-jet printer and sliced the pages. There’s actually a whole community of bookbinders in Brooklyn. There’s a supply center called Talas in Bushwick that has all the bookbinding stuff you could ever want, so I got all these wonderfully weird items like an awl which looks like a murder weapon. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Writing and Building “Concrete Fever”: An Interview With Nathaniel Kressen)

To source the paper I went to a weird alcove-warehouse in the middle of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. You go through paper swatches like you do with paint swatches. I walked out of there spending a lot more money than I intended, because it turns out I’m a paper nerd. After that I formatted it and just printed it out on a laser-jet printer and sliced the pages. There’s actually a whole community of bookbinders in Brooklyn. There’s a supply center called Talas in Bushwick that has all the bookbinding stuff you could ever want, so I got all these wonderfully weird items like an awl which looks like a murder weapon. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Writing and Building “Concrete Fever”: An Interview With Nathaniel Kressen)

1
"It’s a cliché – itself an old printing word – but true: one of the many ways that capitalism works, or doesn’t, is that it forces more responsibilities on less people. In books, that means that over the past century editing, for example, has gone from being the province of editors, to that of agents, to that of MFA programs. I might not have a problem with a future in which the writer must become his or her own publisher (editor, art director, marketing department), distributor, wholesaler and retailer… But I do have a problem with the disingenuousness of the job description. Read between the lines and find a future in which the writer is also the reader – the only reader. Which is fucked. For me, the only justification for a massmarket has always been how it’s kept me out of “communities.” I don’t do well by communities. I like living alone, borrowing clothing, and eating all my meals at delis." (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Revisiting Numbers and Documenting Atlantic City: A Between Books Interview with Joshua Cohen)

"It’s a cliché – itself an old printing word – but true: one of the many ways that capitalism works, or doesn’t, is that it forces more responsibilities on less people. In books, that means that over the past century editing, for example, has gone from being the province of editors, to that of agents, to that of MFA programs. I might not have a problem with a future in which the writer must become his or her own publisher (editor, art director, marketing department), distributor, wholesaler and retailer… But I do have a problem with the disingenuousness of the job description. Read between the lines and find a future in which the writer is also the reader – the only reader. Which is fucked. For me, the only justification for a massmarket has always been how it’s kept me out of “communities.” I don’t do well by communities. I like living alone, borrowing clothing, and eating all my meals at delis." (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Revisiting Numbers and Documenting Atlantic City: A Between Books Interview with Joshua Cohen)