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Anyone coming into a tome about the Beat Generation probably knows something about its most renowned writers. While this familiarity comes in handy and helps the book set its hooks in early, American Smoke is a strange and unpredictable read because Sinclair’s brings together key figures of the Beat Generation and interweaves their stories with those of the places in which they worked, his own thoughts, memories, and feelings, and tangential narratives about the people who surrounded their lives. This is a fragmented autobiography of Iain Sinclair as much as it is a book about the Beats, pop culture, movies, travelling, Olson’s Gloucester, Burrough’s Lawrence, and the secrets, lies, and half-truths often found when conducting research on famous characters. The result of this wild mixture is a multilayered text in which names like Ginsberg and Kerouac end up intermingling with others as unexpected as Courtney Love and Aliester Crowley. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Review: “American Smoke,” Iain Sinclair’s History of the Beat Generation)

Anyone coming into a tome about the Beat Generation probably knows something about its most renowned writers. While this familiarity comes in handy and helps the book set its hooks in early, American Smoke is a strange and unpredictable read because Sinclair’s brings together key figures of the Beat Generation and interweaves their stories with those of the places in which they worked, his own thoughts, memories, and feelings, and tangential narratives about the people who surrounded their lives. This is a fragmented autobiography of Iain Sinclair as much as it is a book about the Beats, pop culture, movies, travelling, Olson’s Gloucester, Burrough’s Lawrence, and the secrets, lies, and half-truths often found when conducting research on famous characters. The result of this wild mixture is a multilayered text in which names like Ginsberg and Kerouac end up intermingling with others as unexpected as Courtney Love and Aliester Crowley. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Review: “American Smoke,” Iain Sinclair’s History of the Beat Generation)

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Moodwise, The Spray was meant to cover a very specific spectrum based on what we both took away from the Jonathan Lethem short story of the same name. Overall, I think we were aiming for notes of ambivalence and resignation but we have a…tendency towards the ebullient even when we’re trying to bum out the listener. SIMISM was meant as a return to those comfortable, feel-good waters. We used the word “shameless” a lot when we were making it. We wanted it to radiate positivity. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | “We Wanted It To Radiate Positivity”: An Interview with Seattle’s USF)

Moodwise, The Spray was meant to cover a very specific spectrum based on what we both took away from the Jonathan Lethem short story of the same name. Overall, I think we were aiming for notes of ambivalence and resignation but we have a…tendency towards the ebullient even when we’re trying to bum out the listener. SIMISM was meant as a return to those comfortable, feel-good waters. We used the word “shameless” a lot when we were making it. We wanted it to radiate positivity. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | “We Wanted It To Radiate Positivity”: An Interview with Seattle’s USF)

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Vol. 1 Brooklyn | “The Urge Towards Making Meaning”: A Conversation with Scott Cheshire, Part Two
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Almost Live at Mellow Pages: Mike Young
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Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Bodies, Dreams, and Blood: An Interview with Aaron Burch
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Vol. 1 Brooklyn | How To Catch a Coyote: A Conversation with Christy Crutchfield
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Almost Live at Mellow Pages: Elissa Schappell
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Vol. 1 Brooklyn | The Art of Remembering Incorrectly: An Interview with Catherine Lacey