She worked normal hours. She carried warriors to Valhalla, repelled Freyjan incursions, delivered barrels of mead to the honored dead. Often I’d come home late from my shitty I.T. job and find her with her feet on the sofa, helmet perched on a floor lamp, eating cereal from one of my bowls. 

The first months were awesome and basic. We talked, ate, slept, fooled around. I taught her about brunch. As I fell asleep, she told me stories about the world before humans, about the great forest, the unpolluted seas, the empty blue sky. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Sunday Stories: “Valkyrie”)

She worked normal hours. She carried warriors to Valhalla, repelled Freyjan incursions, delivered barrels of mead to the honored dead. Often I’d come home late from my shitty I.T. job and find her with her feet on the sofa, helmet perched on a floor lamp, eating cereal from one of my bowls.

The first months were awesome and basic. We talked, ate, slept, fooled around. I taught her about brunch. As I fell asleep, she told me stories about the world before humans, about the great forest, the unpolluted seas, the empty blue sky. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Sunday Stories: “Valkyrie”)

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dustedmagazine:

image

Greg Cartwright was, is and ever shall be the eminence grise of garage rock, having guided seemingly innumerable seminal acts, not the least of which include The Oblivians, Parting Gifts, Compulsive Gamblers, 68 Comeback, Deadly Snakes, Detroit Cobras and The Reigning Sound. Shattered, the latest Reigning Sound record and first for Merge, was written in North Carolina, where Cartwright’s lived for a decade, and recorded at Daptone in Brooklyn, where drummer Mikey Post works, but its sound is rooted in the loamy musical soil of Cartwright’s old sod, Memphis. Shattered swings through gritty garage rock, greasy R&B, grainy soul and galloping country — just like the selections in his Listed guest column.

Read More

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Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Lucidity, Faith, and Generations: A Review of Scott Cheshire’s “High As the Horses’ Bridles”
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nyrbclassics:

Neil Gaiman answered readers’ questions about James Thurber’s The 13 Clocks for the Wall Street Journal's Book Club. Here is his response to the submission: “Was James Thurber thinking of pleasing the reader when he wrote this story, or was he writing for pure joy, to please himself?” and describes his Stardust as being the most similar to The 13 Clocks of all his books. He also shouts out Sylvia Townsend Warner.

You can watch the full conversation here.

Vol. 1 Brooklyn | An Excerpt from Toby Ball’s “Invisible Streets”
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Anyone coming into a tome about the Beat Generation probably knows something about its most renowned writers. While this familiarity comes in handy and helps the book set its hooks in early, American Smoke is a strange and unpredictable read because Sinclair’s brings together key figures of the Beat Generation and interweaves their stories with those of the places in which they worked, his own thoughts, memories, and feelings, and tangential narratives about the people who surrounded their lives. This is a fragmented autobiography of Iain Sinclair as much as it is a book about the Beats, pop culture, movies, travelling, Olson’s Gloucester, Burrough’s Lawrence, and the secrets, lies, and half-truths often found when conducting research on famous characters. The result of this wild mixture is a multilayered text in which names like Ginsberg and Kerouac end up intermingling with others as unexpected as Courtney Love and Aliester Crowley. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Review: “American Smoke,” Iain Sinclair’s History of the Beat Generation)

Anyone coming into a tome about the Beat Generation probably knows something about its most renowned writers. While this familiarity comes in handy and helps the book set its hooks in early, American Smoke is a strange and unpredictable read because Sinclair’s brings together key figures of the Beat Generation and interweaves their stories with those of the places in which they worked, his own thoughts, memories, and feelings, and tangential narratives about the people who surrounded their lives. This is a fragmented autobiography of Iain Sinclair as much as it is a book about the Beats, pop culture, movies, travelling, Olson’s Gloucester, Burrough’s Lawrence, and the secrets, lies, and half-truths often found when conducting research on famous characters. The result of this wild mixture is a multilayered text in which names like Ginsberg and Kerouac end up intermingling with others as unexpected as Courtney Love and Aliester Crowley. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | Review: “American Smoke,” Iain Sinclair’s History of the Beat Generation)

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Moodwise, The Spray was meant to cover a very specific spectrum based on what we both took away from the Jonathan Lethem short story of the same name. Overall, I think we were aiming for notes of ambivalence and resignation but we have a…tendency towards the ebullient even when we’re trying to bum out the listener. SIMISM was meant as a return to those comfortable, feel-good waters. We used the word “shameless” a lot when we were making it. We wanted it to radiate positivity. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | “We Wanted It To Radiate Positivity”: An Interview with Seattle’s USF)

Moodwise, The Spray was meant to cover a very specific spectrum based on what we both took away from the Jonathan Lethem short story of the same name. Overall, I think we were aiming for notes of ambivalence and resignation but we have a…tendency towards the ebullient even when we’re trying to bum out the listener. SIMISM was meant as a return to those comfortable, feel-good waters. We used the word “shameless” a lot when we were making it. We wanted it to radiate positivity. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | “We Wanted It To Radiate Positivity”: An Interview with Seattle’s USF)

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Vol. 1 Brooklyn | “The Urge Towards Making Meaning”: A Conversation with Scott Cheshire, Part Two