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englishkillsreview:

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Jason Diamond read from “A Guided Tour of My Midwestern Failures.” 

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D. Foy read his debut novel, Made to Break. Previously, he read at McNally Jackson

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Megan Stielstra read an essay about growing old from her collection Once I Was Cool. 

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Erika Wurth read from her debut novel, Crazy Horse’s Girlfriend, released yesterday by Curbside Splendor press. 

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Dmitry Samarov read a selection on driving cabs from his memoir, Where To?, also from Curbside Splendor press. 

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hodgman:

Dmitry samarov, is reading tonight at Housing Works Bookstore/Cafe as part of an vol1brooklyn evening of midwestern writing. 

I STRONGLY ENCOURAGE YOU TO ATTEND.

Click HERE for details. 

Dmitry is an artist and a former cab driver whose memoirs of his many years as a hack in Chicago have been both PUBLISHED and cinematically retold via John McNaughton above and HERE

If you do not live near or in the Housing Works bookstore, check out his other upcoming appearances HERE

DS is one of the number one dudes in creation. 

That is all. 

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I feel conservative as a writer. I try to create things that I would enjoy as a reader, and I count on the fact that I am not a unique person, that there are many people out there quite like me. So if I craft something that suits my particular tastes, and I’m honest with myself about that, then some other schmuck with similar interests might also enjoy it. It’s one of the perks of being a humdrum person. And so that doesn’t feel like an experiment, but a kind of conservatism. Another way to say what I mean is that I don’t believe experimental fiction exists. Or: what is it. What is being tested. Who is the control group. Where does the data go. What technologies will be borne out of the results. It’s an absurd metaphor. Another way of saying what I mean is that all work is experimental. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | The Unfathomable and the Traditional: An Interview with Dolan Morgan)

I feel conservative as a writer. I try to create things that I would enjoy as a reader, and I count on the fact that I am not a unique person, that there are many people out there quite like me. So if I craft something that suits my particular tastes, and I’m honest with myself about that, then some other schmuck with similar interests might also enjoy it. It’s one of the perks of being a humdrum person. And so that doesn’t feel like an experiment, but a kind of conservatism. Another way to say what I mean is that I don’t believe experimental fiction exists. Or: what is it. What is being tested. Who is the control group. Where does the data go. What technologies will be borne out of the results. It’s an absurd metaphor. Another way of saying what I mean is that all work is experimental. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | The Unfathomable and the Traditional: An Interview with Dolan Morgan)

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dustedmagazine:

The first wave of psychedelia was formed by a fairly narrow set of experiences. By and large, it was made by people in their 20s — people who had taken some drugs and had some sex and wanted more of both. It was all about an appetite for sensual overload. What priorities and life experiences might shape psychedelia made by a guy in his 50s? Probably enough sex and substances to know the limits and live with the consequences of each, as well as plenty of other experiences that those youngsters couldn’t even imagine. Facing the deaths of people you know and living on, raising kids on free-lancer wages, partnership beyond the dissolution of love, take your pick… how will that stuff make your head spin when you put it into the brain that spits out a tune? 

Read More

Things we enjoy: most everything The Clean-related.

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I’m from New York and now I live in Chicago. To Chris, that’s insane. He’s a Vermont person. Has been forever. Maple syrup courses through his veins. He swims and sails in the summer, and in the winter he skis and snowboards down the Green Mountains, although winter sports, he warns me, are not as elegant as summer ones. Elegant is one of Chris’ favorite words. And he uses the verb to navigate effortlessly, not in its corporate sense of navigating the pitfalls in a project plan, but actual navigation on fresh water. I know Chris is excited to get back home, since Vermont’s sunny days are limited. All it’s done this summer in Vermont is rain. It’s caused some serious issues with Burlington’s antiquated drainage system. I read all about it in the local papers. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | What’s a Travel Essay?)

I’m from New York and now I live in Chicago. To Chris, that’s insane. He’s a Vermont person. Has been forever. Maple syrup courses through his veins. He swims and sails in the summer, and in the winter he skis and snowboards down the Green Mountains, although winter sports, he warns me, are not as elegant as summer ones. Elegant is one of Chris’ favorite words. And he uses the verb to navigate effortlessly, not in its corporate sense of navigating the pitfalls in a project plan, but actual navigation on fresh water. I know Chris is excited to get back home, since Vermont’s sunny days are limited. All it’s done this summer in Vermont is rain. It’s caused some serious issues with Burlington’s antiquated drainage system. I read all about it in the local papers. (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | What’s a Travel Essay?)

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Almost Live at Mellow Pages: Zachary Lipez
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When I see the term “new filmmaking” in here, I’m reminded of the “new flesh” in the film Videodrome. Was that a conscious allusion? 
Wow, I saw Videodrome so long ago, when it first came out, and haven’t seen it since. It certainly wasn’t a conscious allusion but the “new flesh” must still be in my subconscious somewhere. And Cronenberg is also Canadian. I actually think there must be a few interesting parallels between Videodrome and Polyamorous Love Song, but I would really have to see the film again to comment further. Sometimes I feel like my work is such a strong reaction against Canadian literature, searching for something more international, less conventional, more unexpected or adventurous. But perhaps this desire blocks me from realizing the many ways in which my work is strangely Canadian. I find it hard to remember all the Canadian artists I like (Glenn Gould, Destroyer, Guy Maddin, the little known writer Juan Butler, I’m sure there must be so many more) and see how my work could be seen as well within this tradition of Canadian eccentricity. Do they like Canadians in New York? (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | “A Terrible, Even Paralyzing Goal”: Talking Narratives With Jacob Wren)

When I see the term “new filmmaking” in here, I’m reminded of the “new flesh” in the film Videodrome. Was that a conscious allusion?
Wow, I saw Videodrome so long ago, when it first came out, and haven’t seen it since. It certainly wasn’t a conscious allusion but the “new flesh” must still be in my subconscious somewhere. And Cronenberg is also Canadian. I actually think there must be a few interesting parallels between Videodrome and Polyamorous Love Song, but I would really have to see the film again to comment further. Sometimes I feel like my work is such a strong reaction against Canadian literature, searching for something more international, less conventional, more unexpected or adventurous. But perhaps this desire blocks me from realizing the many ways in which my work is strangely Canadian. I find it hard to remember all the Canadian artists I like (Glenn Gould, Destroyer, Guy Maddin, the little known writer Juan Butler, I’m sure there must be so many more) and see how my work could be seen as well within this tradition of Canadian eccentricity. Do they like Canadians in New York? (via Vol. 1 Brooklyn | “A Terrible, Even Paralyzing Goal”: Talking Narratives With Jacob Wren)